Samite of Uganda



Samite's non-profit making organization, 'Musicians for World Harmony' dedicated to raising funds for less privileged Africans is setting off with the 'Voices of Hope concert' scheduled for May 8th a concert to benefit Musicians for World Harmony. Special guests include Mar Gueye, Jeff Haynes, Richie Stearns, and Charlie Shew. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for students and are on sale at the Ticket Center at Clinton House (273-4497), Willard Straight Hall Ticket Office, and at www.IthacaEvents.com
Wednesday, January 12th, 2005

Samite

Uganda's US-based Kalimba or Lukeme (thumb piano) virtuoso Samite's ‘Mwatu' song off his latest ‘Tunila eno' album is being featured on The BBC's World music show hosted by Charlie Gillett this week. The song, which was recorded in New York, has masterful thumb piano playing by one of Uganda's world music ambassadors.
Charlie on this programme describes World music as one of the only forms not dominated by America. The show features many forms of this from Africa to South America to the Middle East.
Samite, together with others like Geoffrey Oryema, are Ugandan artists that has lived and breathed World Music and his Kiganda storytelling skills, which he exudes in his work, is one way in which Ugandan culture is being redistributed internationally. On the African continent, he is compared to greats like Yossou N'Dour.
You can read more about Charlie Gillett and listen to the show online at
http://www.soundoftheworld.com

Friday, October 29th, 2004
Musicians for World Harmony
By MusicUganda reporter


On October 9th 2004, Samite posted a message on his official web site, www.samite.com to inform all those that follow his music and activities about a new organization he has has set up. It is a non-profit organization titled 'Musicians for World Harmony'. The primary objective of this organization is to raise at least 50,000 dollars to help the displaced and starving children in Africa, mainly focusing on child soldiers and children in camps like the ones in Gulu, northern Uganda.
As one of the activities for the organization, he is going to visit West Africa where he will meet and perform with local musicians. Seria Leone is one of the countries he plans to visit. He will then proceed to East Africa where we hope he will be able to visit the displaced people in Gulu. The memories of the civil strife that led him out of Uganda many years ago are still fresh in his mind and must be the reason why he has decided try and make a change the best way he how; through music.
If you would like to join their mailing list to receive updates on their programs, or know others who share a similar interest, please contact them at info@musiciansforworldharmony.org or write to P. O. Box 892 Ithaca, NY 14851.
We at musicuganda.com shall do whatever is possible to support this noble cause. To read more about Samite, his music and activities, visit his official web site at www.samite.com. You can also visit www.musiciansforworldharmony.org for more about the organization.
Previous article: Samite's new album

Samite's 'Tunula Eno' album

Samite of Uganda

Samite's non-profit making organization, 'Musicians for World Harmony' dedicated to raising funds for less privileged Africans is setting off with the 'Voices of Hope concert' scheduled for May 8th a concert to benefit Musicians for World Harmony. Special guests include Mar Gueye, Jeff Haynes, Richie Stearns, and Charlie Shew. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for students and are on sale at the Ticket Center at Clinton House (273-4497), Willard Straight Hall Ticket Office, and at www.IthacaEvents.com
Wednesday, January 12th, 2005

Samite
Uganda's US-based Kalimba or Lukeme (thumb piano) virtuoso Samite's ‘Mwatu' song off his latest ‘Tunila eno' album is being featured on The BBC's World music show hosted by Charlie Gillett this week. The song, which was recorded in New York, has masterful thumb piano playing by one of Uganda's world music ambassadors.
Charlie on this programme describes World music as one of the only forms not dominated by America. The show features many forms of this from Africa to South America to the Middle East.
Samite, together with others like Geoffrey Oryema, are Ugandan artists that has lived and breathed World Music and his Kiganda storytelling skills, which he exudes in his work, is one way in which Ugandan culture is being redistributed internationally. On the African continent, he is compared to greats like Yossou N'Dour.
You can read more about Charlie Gillett and listen to the show online at
http://www.soundoftheworld.com
Friday, October 29th, 2004
Musicians for World Harmony
By MusicUganda reporter
On October 9th 2004, Samite posted a message on his official web site, www.samite.com to inform all those that follow his music and activities about a new organization he has has set up. It is a non-profit organization titled 'Musicians for World Harmony'. The primary objective of this organization is to raise at least 50,000 dollars to help the displaced and starving children in Africa, mainly focusing on child soldiers and children in camps like the ones in Gulu, northern Uganda.
As one of the activities for the organization, he is going to visit West Africa where he will meet and perform with local musicians. Seria Leone is one of the countries he plans to visit. He will then proceed to East Africa where we hope he will be able to visit the displaced people in Gulu. The memories of the civil strife that led him out of Uganda many years ago are still fresh in his mind and must be the reason why he has decided try and make a change the best way he how; through music.
If you would like to join their mailing list to receive updates on their programs, or know others who share a similar interest, please contact them at info@musiciansforworldharmony.org or write to P. O. Box 892 Ithaca, NY 14851.
We at musicuganda.com shall do whatever is possible to support this noble cause. To read more about Samite, his music and activities, visit his official web site at www.samite.com. You can also visit www.musiciansforworldharmony.org for more about the organization.
Previous article: Samite's new album

Samite's 'Tunula Eno' album

The last time musicuganda communicated with Samite, he was working on his 6th 'Tunula Eno' album which was keeping him on his toes. We are happy to inform you that the album was released and has been acclaimed internationally.

Here is an editorial review by Christina Roden of Amazon.com:

"Samite, who hails from the Southern African* nation of Uganda, is that rare multi-instrumentalist can make a flute weep or a simple thumb piano spout epic poetry. As a composer, his works range from spacious idylls to polyrhythmic, dance-inducing charmers. His clear tenor voice, with its soaring falsetto, has the kind of poignant beauty and artful tenderness that made international icons of Milton Nascimento and Vusi Mahlesela. His life has not been easy; he lost a brother under Idi Amin, endured a prolonged exile from his homeland, and is now dealing with the premature passing of his beloved wife, Joan. His reaction, as always, is to sing about his feelings, but while some of the present material is elegiac, it is not so light-textured as on earlier releases. Instead, Samite veers between avowals of longing and resignation, observations about the necessities of life, and even unexpected, healing flashes of humor. --Christina Roden"
*The only glitch may be that Uganda is actually and East African country, not Southern African.
The best part about Samite is that his music cuts across regions with it's authentic traditional instrumentation and Luganda lyrics. This is probably why he is most popularly referred to as 'Samite of Uganda', a title which he undisputedly deserves.

If you have watched the captivating drama series "Ensitano" on WBS TV, then you have listened to Samite's music. As the credits are made at the end of the half-hour show, you will see one that says "Music by Samite". His music is very clear and most of it has that easily recognizable trademark calmness.

He has a very tight tour schedule which runs until August
8th 2004. This will take him to places like Philadelphia, Memphis, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and other cities and towns all over the United States
Samite plays many traditional African/Ugandan instruments but is best known for playing the thumb piano so swiftly in ways that make many imagine that he and the instrument are cousins.
He left Uganda in 1987 and for the past ten years, he has made his living as Uganda's unofficial music ambassador to the USA. He is a Muganda man called Mulondo who grew up in the Kabaka's Courtyard listening to his father play traditional tunes for most of his childhood. He grew up watching Buganda's best instrumentalists and that probably explains the richness in his music.

"I am convinced that we are all moved by the same desires, needs and emotions, regardless of the language in which those feelings are expressed," says Samite.


"Samite, who hails from the Southern African* nation of Uganda, is that rare multi-instrumentalist can make a flute weep or a simple thumb piano spout epic poetry. As a composer, his works range from spacious idylls to polyrhythmic, dance-inducing charmers. His clear tenor voice, with its soaring falsetto, has the kind of poignant beauty and artful tenderness that made international icons of Milton Nascimento and Vusi Mahlesela. His life has not been easy; he lost a brother under Idi Amin, endured a prolonged exile from his homeland, and is now dealing with the premature passing of his beloved wife, Joan. His reaction, as always, is to sing about his feelings, but while some of the present material is elegiac, it is not so light-textured as on earlier releases. Instead, Samite veers between avowals of longing and resignation, observations about the necessities of life, and even unexpected, healing flashes of humor. --Christina Roden"
*The only glitch may be that Uganda is actually and East African country, not Southern African.
The best part about Samite is that his music cuts across regions with it's authentic traditional instrumentation and Luganda lyrics. This is probably why he is most popularly referred to as 'Samite of Uganda', a title which he undisputedly deserves.

If you have watched the captivating drama series "Ensitano" on WBS TV, then you have listened to Samite's music. As the credits are made at the end of the half-hour show, you will see one that says "Music by Samite". His music is very clear and most of it has that easily recognizable trademark calmness.

He has a very tight tour schedule which runs until August
8th 2004. This will take him to places like Philadelphia, Memphis, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and other cities and towns all over the United States
Samite plays many traditional African/Ugandan instruments but is best known for playing the thumb piano so swiftly in ways that make many imagine that he and the instrument are cousins.
He left Uganda in 1987 and for the past ten years, he has made his living as Uganda's unofficial music ambassador to the USA. He is a Muganda man called Mulondo who grew up in the Kabaka's Courtyard listening to his father play traditional tunes for most of his childhood. He grew up watching Buganda's best instrumentalists and that probably explains the richness in his music.

"I am convinced that we are all moved by the same desires, needs and emotions, regardless of the language in which those feelings are expressed," says Samite.